Tuesday, February 10, 2009

The skirmish ends... and who are those infantry regiments??

Without a bang or a whimper, I can report that the skirmish at Carnine has now ended as of move nine.... I was preparing myself for a long 'stern chase' (apologies, too much time spent on the excellent Warhammer "Trafalgar" Yahoo group recently!) as DG was beginning to make his remaining Ranger unit scarce, but in the end the damage had been done sufficiently that his two failed morale tests in move 8 and 9 resulted in further losses as his unit continued to rout to eventual extinction...

In the picture, at the top of the page you can see the Rangers routing to the north, being followed by the first of my Militia units (the unit that's recently been awarded battle honours - please vote for your flag design of choice by the way - less than 12 hours to go..) further towards the bottom of the picture Lauzun's (the cavalry) are beginning to hit top gear, and you can almost hear the scrape of swords as they are loosened in the scabbard. They are accompanied (more slowly) by the second Militia unit...

Post match analysis:
  • With regard to mechanics, nothing really to add over and above what we've already discussed - nine moves took just over 5 weeks of virtual gaming, and probably would have taken half an hour face to face across the table... I guess we were turning moves round every couple of days or so, but the moves were split down into phases as described in the rules we use..
  • Casualties for the Americans (me) were fairly light - with the Dragoons taking the only damage, suffering 3 SP's lost. Using the campaign rules discussed earlier I rolled and discovered that with a “Current Morale Value” (CMV) of 2 (made up of 1 Strength Point (SP) left and 1 for their morale bonus which is +1 ie. better than average). I then throw 2D6 with the following results:
    1. 2: 2-CMV = 0 = immediate recovery of 1SP
    2. 8: 8 - CMV = 6 = 1SP recovered in 6 hours/turns
    3. 8 again...

    So 1SP back immediately, the other two in 6 turns...


More detail will be added to the campaign page...

On to other stuff - after a marathon session at the painting table in the newly re-organised loftwaffe I have now completed the last stands of the other troop of British cavalry for the Sudan. I'll post some pictures once they're fully based (they don't "count" until then!) but that now gives me the required bases to represent two troops of British cavalry in mounted & dismounted mode - with enough horse holders for both. My Sudan rules use Peter Gilders suggested organisation, & in those two troops make a squadron....

What else?? Nick Dorrell responded to my original post on the research I'd done to see what I could find out about those War of the Spanish Succession units he was trying to identify (thanks Nick) - he seems to have had the same kind of success I did, so once again if anyone has any information on the following units get in touch with Nick via the Early Linear Warfare Yahoo group (click here), or leave a comment here...

When I left this in the last post I said I was going to have a go at finding what I could about the Infantry Regiments next... for the record they are:

Infantry: Mohun's/ Dormer's, J.Caulfield's / Bowles, Lepell's / Richards', Munden's, Gore's, Bourke's or Bourgay's, Dalziel's.

  • Mohun's/ Dormer's: Some success - "Lord Mohun's Regiment of Foot" is listed as having been on the establishment from 1702-1713. They had two tours of duty in Spain - once in 1706, and once in 1710 (and Flanders in between), and according to the history Mohun would have commanded in 1706, and Dormer in 1710 as Dormer became colonel in May 1708. Regiment was disbanded after the Treaty of Utrecht... unfortunately nothing in Grant for their uniform..
  • J.Caulfield's / Bowles: There are two Caulfields listed in regiment.org, but J would be John who was colonel of an unnamed foot regiment from 1704 - 1705; much more difficult search this one - I can't find anything for John Caulfield at all on Google, there are a lot of Caulfields in Ireland at the time though, so I suspect he was Irish gentry?? Now it gets really difficult as the Bowles family seemed to have a liking for the name Phineas - there are two listed! One was colonel of a dragoon regiment so I don't think he's the one.. he was founding colonel of the 12th Dragoons who were raised in 1715, and after our specific period of interest. The other one seems more likely, and according to this site he came from a family of London glass makers, in 1710, aged just twenty, he was commissioned a captain in the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot, initially stationed in Spain.... aha! In 1713, Bowles transferred to the 3rd Foot Guards (later the Scots Guards), as captain and lieutenant-colonel. In 1715, he helped in suppressing the Jacobite rising, and in March 1719, he succeeded his cousin (the first one I mentioned) as colonel of the 12th Lancers, stationed in Ireland. Again, nothing in Grant for their uniform..
  • Lepell's / Richards': Probably the one I have most information on already, as this is the same regiment of foot that Nicholas Lepell left when he became Colonel of the Dragoon regiment of the same name (see previous post) - we know that the foot regiment were in Ireland up until the point they were recalled on February 6th 1709. Lepell remained their colonel until 1710, when left to take over command of the aforementioned etc etc etc. According to Regiment.org Lepell was at the Battle of Saragossa in August of 1710 but no idea what regiment it was he was in charge of! The Richards referred to is probably Michael Richards (that's him to the right), who is listed on regiment.org as being colonel of an un-named foot regiment from 1710 to 1711..... a google of his name along with "colonel" and "regiment" got a reference to a Colonel Michael Richards who had commanded the artillery train in 1697 for the "The Newfoundland Expedition [click here]" and this page is his diary from the Siege of Limerick [click here] - is it the same man I wonder?? There are no other Richards's listed in regiment.org, but this guy was artillery/engineer? It does say on this page that engineers at the time had no formal military rank - they bought them in the same way everyone else did - it makes reference to him being on a stipend of £100 per annum, it also says on this page that he ended up as the Chief Engineer, he was also a Brigadier and Surveyor-General of the Ordnance, when he died in 1721. Either way, fascinating sites, and I do recommend the Limerick site for a contemporary account of a siege in the age (roughly) of Marlborough (by the way the file is an SGML file, just save it an open with wordpad, or notepad etc.), but no uniform details! Who said that Google isn't really a gigantic black hole for a geek with an interest in military history?!!

...and that's enough fun for this post - I'll have a go at the others later!

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