Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Brother can you spare a time... "Trinity" - a review....

...as I've been very short of it lately... 

I won't apologise for the dearth of posts here lately, as that, I'm afraid, is just the way it is sometimes...as is typical for this time of year all my focus and attention has been on the boat [clicky], so the blog updates have all been going on there as I ticked off jobs prior to the launch date. Happily that has now come and gone, and the boat is in the water, so there's an opportunity for focus to switch back here a little more often...

This weekend is Salute and DG is coming down from the wild lands for the weekend - we have already made arrangements to meet for a game this Friday evening, and the choice is down to me - I may very well break out the American War of Independence and we can fight what will be the fourth John Corrigan Memorial game...

Speaking of Salute, as ever, I have no shopping list - I'm just going up to have a mooch about and soak up the atmosphere..  I always come back from a show with a renewed enthusiasm for the hobby, so I'm hoping this will kick start some painting activity along the lines of the last post...

Separately, I have just finished the second volume in Conn Iggulden's "War of the Roses" saga, "Trinity", and can report that it was a significantly better read than the first volume [clicky] but only one of may favourite characters from the first book features. The book covers the period from just before the 1st Battle of St Albans, to the Battle of Wakefield, and contributed enormously to my understanding of what was a hugely complicated era. Packed full of period colour, and very good descriptions of what it was like to fight in the era, this is a cracker..

Henry (VI) continues to exhibit signs of madness (he was paralysed, and to all intents asleep, for 18 months) and in this absence a power vacuum is filled by Margaret of Anjou (his wife) on one side representing the royal house of Lancaster, and the House of York lead by Richard, 3rd Duke of York, (very) effectively running the country on the other... the Trinity referred to is Richard, and his close allies Salisbury and Warwick (the Kingmaker)

During this period Henry recovers (for a short while) but is plunged into illness again after the 1st Battle of St Albans (a battle that both sides seemed to just stumble into) which he loses, and after which he effectively becomes hostage to York who is acting as regent..

Henry recovers again and relieves Richard, Salisbury and Warwick of all their titles and effectively sending them into exile in Ireland (Richard), and Calais (Warwick) but trouble foments again, and this time despite success at Blore Heath, the Lancastrians win at Ludford Bridge and this time York, Salisbury and Warwick are stripped of their titles and named traitors - not surprisingly they leave the country.

In 1460 they come back, gathering support as they march, they defeat the Lancastrians at Northampton and Henry is taken hostage, and Richard/Salisbury/Warwick reverse the earlier decisions taking back their land and titles and York is named successor. Margaret meanwhile escapes with Henry's son (and heir) - first to Wales, then to Scotland to gather allies...

York moves north to face this threat, and the book ends with the Battle of Wakefield, another Lancastrian victory, but this time Margaret takes no second chances and executes Richard, and Salisbury, on the battlefield.. 


Richard's older son (Edward - the younger son was also killed in the battle) escapes, as does Warwick... Leaving it nicely open for the third book - which must pretty quickly deal with the Battle of Towton..I for one can't wait!

Steve the Wargamer rates this one 9 out of 10....

2 comments:

  1. A much better book I agree. It was good to see the character of Richard Duke of York develop into a much more rounded and to some extent likeable figure. With this novel Iggulden has begun to balance the scales a little from the pro-Lancastrian first novel.

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    1. Paul - agreed - I got the distinct impression Iggulden empathised with a number of the characters (Richard/ Edmund/Margaret/Salisbury), and clearly didn't with a few (Clifford/Gray)... and others he just hints at, as having fatal flaws.... you just know Edward isn't going to finish well....

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